Political association – P Andalucista http://p-andalucista.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 05:42:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://p-andalucista.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/default.png Political association – P Andalucista http://p-andalucista.org/ 32 32 How many are guilty by association? | Letters to the Editor https://p-andalucista.org/how-many-are-guilty-by-association-letters-to-the-editor/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 00:14:00 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/how-many-are-guilty-by-association-letters-to-the-editor/ Frank Sinatra was famous for his alleged links to the Italian mafia. The mafia/mafioso of Italy are the undisputed and legendary creators and breakers of many communities, all over the world. Incredibly wealthy, it is alleged that the mafia created FIFA as a legitimate way to launder their money. We all love football. FIFA is […]]]>

Frank Sinatra was famous for his alleged links to the Italian mafia. The mafia/mafioso of Italy are the undisputed and legendary creators and breakers of many communities, all over the world. Incredibly wealthy, it is alleged that the mafia created FIFA as a legitimate way to launder their money.

We all love football. FIFA is what it is. I haven’t seen anything from the Netflix production. No need for that. Netflix only provides the photographs, the stories, any allegations of willful wrongdoing. It’s like that.

When I say that Jack Warner is Frank Sinatra’s brother, I mean it from the perspective that Jack’s life story mirrors Frank’s. Two talented people, determined at all costs to succeed in life.

Fame, in all its manifestations, was achieved by both men.

So while Franks sings, the record shows, he ate it all up, then spat it out and lived his life, his way. The regrets for Frank were too few to mention because, as he says, what is a man but himself?

So, is our very talented and famous Jack Warner ready to face the political Grammy Awards and walk the red carpet of the political Oscars for the police in the United States?

It’s T&T where even the bandits have parents, children and friends who unequivocally love them.

But isn’t it also true that there is guilt by association, even if you live your life your way? How many people at T&T, from any of our political parties, are willing to roll with Jack?

Lynette Joseph

Diego Martin

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GE15 an opportunity to participate in the democratic process, says Sarawak Association of Churches https://p-andalucista.org/ge15-an-opportunity-to-participate-in-the-democratic-process-says-sarawak-association-of-churches/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 08:26:40 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/ge15-an-opportunity-to-participate-in-the-democratic-process-says-sarawak-association-of-churches/ Voters in Sarawak, especially Christians, are encouraged to vote in the 15th General Election (GE15) and participate in the democratic process. November 17, 2022 KUCHING: Voters in Sarawak, especially Christians, are encouraged to vote in the 15th General Election (GE15) and participate in the democratic process. In a pastoral letter, the Sarawak Association of Churches […]]]>

Voters in Sarawak, especially Christians, are encouraged to vote in the 15th General Election (GE15) and participate in the democratic process.

November 17, 2022

KUCHING: Voters in Sarawak, especially Christians, are encouraged to vote in the 15th General Election (GE15) and participate in the democratic process.

In a pastoral letter, the Sarawak Association of Churches (ACS) said the GE15 was an opportunity to democratically elect leaders for the next term.

“The ACS, as a religious organization, does not endorse any political party, but encourages every citizen to pray for a safe election and to vote according to their conscience as a moral responsibility to the nation and to God,” the president, Archbishop Simon Poh (November 12).

He added that young people who had the right to vote should realize that they are contributing to Malaysia by voting.

He reminded Christians to exercise their moral duty to vote on November 19.

“By voting, we hold our government and our candidates accountable to follow the chops; fulfilling the promises made in the rakyat; work for the common good and the well-being of all; defend religious freedom for all races and faiths; and ensuring mutual respect and acceptance, harmony and unity in diversity in Malaysia,” the letter read.

The letter also advised voters to consider political parties and the integrity of candidates on issues such as development, citizens’ rights, religious freedom and welfare.

“We urge you to stand up, stand up for the common good of our nation, and choose wisely.

“May your vote be a blessing to Sarawak, the land of unity and harmony of our Malaysian nation,” he added.The star

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Harvard Undergraduate Association awards $1,000 to pilot new turkey mascot | New https://p-andalucista.org/harvard-undergraduate-association-awards-1000-to-pilot-new-turkey-mascot-new/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 06:27:13 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/harvard-undergraduate-association-awards-1000-to-pilot-new-turkey-mascot-new/ After roaming the streets of Harvard Square for centuries, Cambridge’s iconic turkeys may soon be roosting in new territory: Harvard Stadium. A new initiative from the Harvard Undergraduate Association will allocate $1,000 to pilot the turkey as Harvard’s new mascot in response to a perceived lack of academic spirit. The Association voted in favor of […]]]>

After roaming the streets of Harvard Square for centuries, Cambridge’s iconic turkeys may soon be roosting in new territory: Harvard Stadium.

A new initiative from the Harvard Undergraduate Association will allocate $1,000 to pilot the turkey as Harvard’s new mascot in response to a perceived lack of academic spirit. The Association voted in favor of the measure at its general meeting in Isaacson Room at the Smith Campus Center on Sunday.

The body also sought revisions to an open letter to the presidential search committee and announced the creation of a new task force on affordable graduation celebrations.

At Sunday’s meeting, Felix B. Bulwa ’23 presented research on students’ reported levels of school spirit and offered a potential solution: a new feathered mascot. In a survey conducted in March for the Harvard Political Review, more than 70% of 130 respondents supported a new mascot.

“What I discovered through my study is that we have a lot of spirit in sub-communities and sub-sections on campus,” Bulwa said at the meeting. “We lack that cross-functional spirit that most other colleges, even Ivy League colleges, tend to have.”

Although Harvard sports teams officially compete under the name “Harvard Crimson”, the College’s official mascot is “John Harvard the Pilgrim” – a figure Bulwa called “problematic”. The turkey, Bulwa said, would not replace the ubiquitous “Crimson” branding in Harvard athletics, but rather interact with fans at sporting events.

To justify choosing a turkey, Bulwa pointed to the bird’s prevalence on campus and adherence to Harvard’s color scheme. About thirty-six percent of respondents to Bulwa’s survey rank the turkey as their top choice for a mascot. Lobster came second.

The push for a turkey mascot isn’t new. A 2016 Facebook page solicited signatures from students in favor of a turkey mascot without success.

HUA co-chairs LyLena D. Estabine ’24 and Travis Allen Johnson ’24 endorsed the initiative, as did College Dean Rakesh Khurana at a recent meeting, according to the couple. Of the 16 voting students present at the meeting, 12 supported the pilot initiative and four did not oppose.

The Association will pilot the new turkey mascot at the Harvard-Yale tailgate and use the $1,000 allocation to purchase a turkey costume and promotional materials.

At Sunday’s meeting, the Association created a new task force dedicated to promoting affordability for graduation traditions, including class rings.

Harvard College does not currently offer an official class ring service, but a HUA-approved affiliate company, Balfour, offers custom rings between $500 and $1,000.

The organization also allocated $2,500 for the creation of gift bags to be distributed to students in early December during the final exam period.

HUA leaders closed the meeting by seeking comments on an open letter to the presidential search committee. The letter details the students’ priorities for the University’s next leader.

In its current form, the letter asks the committee to select a candidate who is committed to “diversity, equity and inclusion”, “mental health” and “intellectual vitality”, among others.

—Writer Mert Geyiktepe can be contacted at mert.geyiktepe@thecrimson.com.

—Editor J. Sellers Hill can be contacted at sellers.hill@thecrimson.com. Follow him on Twitter @SellersHill.

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Murray County High School Alumni Association to add six people to Hall of Fame | Local News https://p-andalucista.org/murray-county-high-school-alumni-association-to-add-six-people-to-hall-of-fame-local-news/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/murray-county-high-school-alumni-association-to-add-six-people-to-hall-of-fame-local-news/ On Sunday afternoon, November 20, the Murray County High School Alumni Association (MCHS) will add six to its prestigious Hall of Fame. The ceremony will begin at 2 p.m. in the meeting room of the Murray County Schools Pickering Administrative Center (Rock Building) on ​​Green Road. The Hall of Fame was established in 1993 to […]]]>

On Sunday afternoon, November 20, the Murray County High School Alumni Association (MCHS) will add six to its prestigious Hall of Fame. The ceremony will begin at 2 p.m. in the meeting room of the Murray County Schools Pickering Administrative Center (Rock Building) on ​​Green Road.

The Hall of Fame was established in 1993 to honor former students and staff members who have achieved great success in chosen professions and/or have made outstanding contributions to the community. The 2022 inductees are Ethan Calhoun, Lamarr Henry, Blake Jackson, Jody Ridley, Arthur Jewell Vest and Toby Westmoreland.

Ethan Calhoun

Calhoun entered Murray County High School in 2005 and graduated four years later. While a student at Murray, he belonged to FFA, Beta Club and Drama. Today, he attributes much of his ability and confidence as a public speaker to the skills he honed under the guidance of Melissa Adams during the MCHS production of “Bus Stop” in a one-act competition. While in high school, he also worked as a tour guide and all-weather man at Chief Vann House.

He is currently employed as Deputy Director of Planning at the Northwest Georgia Regional Commission in Rome. He was hired in 2015, quickly earned promotions and captured the attention of people across the state for his work helping small towns achieve their economic development and planning goals with limited resources.

In 2021, he was selected as one of Georgia’s “Best 40 Under 40” by Georgia Trend magazine, which honors the state’s best and brightest young leaders. He feels lucky to be able to stay in Northwest Georgia and play a role in the development of so many communities.

He now resides at Lake Weiss in Center, Alabama, but is a trustee of Friends of Vann House. Important family members to him are parents Wayne and Petra Calhoun; grandparents Edward and Willie Calhoun and Tommie Headrick; uncles and aunts Chuck and Connie Stafford, Jack and Yvette Franklin, and Robert and Loryo Calhoun. Two friends and mentors are Tim Howard and Jeff Stancil.

Henry Lamar

Henry graduated from MCHS in 1960. He was employed in the Murray County Schools system for many years and retired as principal of Spring Place Elementary. He was an outstanding basketball player at MCHS. The team won the state championship its senior year. He received a scholarship to Auburn University and played there for four years, graduating in 1964.

Her parents, Dane and Daisy Henry, were the most influential people of her formative years. Others were MCHS basketball coach Kenneth Ross and agriculture professor GI Maddox along with Auburn basketball coach Joel Eaves. Special friends in high school who were also influential on him included Greg Springfield, Wayne Graves and Selwyn Cochran.

Close family members are his wife Betty, his children Kevin and Lisa and his grandsons Henry and Charlie. Today, Lamarr and Betty live on the Henry Farm in northwest Murray County.

Blake Jackson

Jackson attended Murray County High School from 1995 until graduation in 1999. He is the son of Collian and Kay Jackson of Chatsworth and currently resides in Chelsea, Massachusetts, a suburb of the Boston metro area.

While at Murray High, he participated in many activities. Music was a big part of his life and he spent four years in brass bands and symphony orchestras. play the clarinet. He was in the orchestra during the production of “Brigadoon” and he was active in the Beta Club, National Honor Society, student government, and VOCA while holding a part-time job. He said: “Nothing compares to Friday football at Chatsworth, playing in the band and dancing after the game.”

Since leaving Murray, he has been amazed at the quality of the education he received at school. His teachers really cared and were passionate about what they were teaching. The most notable teachers are Linda Lunsford (English), Dean Donehoo (History), Fred Sylvester III (Music), Rick Chapman (Writing) and Jerry Ryan (Spanish). These and more made his time at Murray High memorable.

He is an award-winning architect, famous for his “green” designs. He is Director of Sustainable Development at NORR, an integrated architecture and engineering firm headquartered in Toronto.

Jody Riley

Ridley, another 1960 graduate of Murray County High School, is the son of Murphy and Irene Ridley. Married to his late wife Margaret for 59 years, he is the father of Anthony (Janice) Ridley and Kim (Shane) Craven. They also have three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

He had a 36-year career in stock car racing. He was an outstanding pilot and received many awards and honors during this time and since. He was the 1980 NASCAR Rookie of the Year for the Winston Cup and winner of the NASCAR Winston Cup and Mason-Dixon 500 in 1981. He was a six-time NASCAR All-Pro National Champion (1987-89 and 1991-93 ). He was also NASCAR All-Pro’s most popular driver three times and the Hooters Pro Cup’s most popular driver in 1996. He has 580 wins in 17 states across the country. He was inducted into the Georgia Racing Hall of Fame in 2007.

He had quite a career. Now retired, he enjoys cruising, restoring old cars and playing with the greats.

Arthur Jewell Vest

Vest attended Murray County High School from 1949 to 1954. After graduating in 1954, he joined the United States Air Force and served for 20 years. After retiring from the Air Force, he spent 16 years as a civilian Air Force employee, serving at the Pentagon and the Colorado Air Force Academy. He also taught at Park University and Del City High School, both in Oklahoma City.

In high school, he participated in many activities, including the Beta Club, the debate team, and college baseball. Three important teachers he remembers most fondly are CW Bradley, Mrs. Hill Jones and Lynn Daniel.

Vest earned three college degrees while serving his country: a Bachelor of Science in Social Studies from Southern Colorado in 1973 and a Master of Arts in Political Science from Oklahoma State in 1980, then a Ph.D. as well.

His immediate family consists of his wife Janice, two daughters, grandchildren and three sisters. He is now retired and lives in Weatherford, Texas.

Toby Westmoreland

Westmoreland attended MCHS from 1987 to 1991. Son of Tut and Linda Westmoreland, he has four siblings and has lived his entire life in Murray County.

While attending Murray High, he was involved in many activities, especially music and drama. He was in choir for all four years and competed in a one-act play competition his junior and senior male solo years. He appeared in several high school drama presentations such as “Little Shop of Horrors”, “The Music Man”, and “The Curious Savage”. He received the Best Actor and Most Talented Awards as well as the MCHS Faculty Scholarship for a Future Teacher.

He began his career in education as a paraprofessional while pursuing a college education. In 1997 he started teaching at Bagley Middle School and remained there for several years and also taught at Murray County High School twice. He served as vice-principal at Woodlawn Elementary from 2014-2016 and retired as an English teacher at Northwest Whitfield High School in 2018. He now teaches professional learning classes for Northwest Georgia RESA as well as other agencies and he was also an instructor for doctoral students. at Liberty University.

He also continued to use and share his musical talents with people across the region. Still active at Mount Carmel Baptist Church, he sang with traveling gospel groups and also organized community singing events to raise money for the MCHS Alumni Scholarship Fund, Linda Lunsford Scholarship and Friends of North Scholarship. Murray.

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Democrats’ circular firing squad starts early – AMAC https://p-andalucista.org/democrats-circular-firing-squad-starts-early-amac/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 14:04:25 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/democrats-circular-firing-squad-starts-early-amac/ AMAC Exclusive – By Andrew Abbott With Republicans poised for big gains in next week’s midterm elections, many Democrats are already pointing fingers and avoiding blame for what appears to be a catastrophic wave of election losses. As in 2020 and 2021, the “progressive” wing of the Democratic Party is […]]]>




AMAC Exclusive – By Andrew Abbott

With Republicans poised for big gains in next week’s midterm elections, many Democrats are already pointing fingers and avoiding blame for what appears to be a catastrophic wave of election losses.

As in 2020 and 2021, the “progressive” wing of the Democratic Party is leading the charge in the blame game. Two years ago, following a disastrous performance for House Democrats, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY), echoing the sentiment of other “Squad” members, said that it was really about the Democrats’ refusal to lean further into radical policies. like “Defund the Police” which cost them seats. “The conversation is a little deeper than saying anything progressive is toxic,” she said then, despite clear evidence that voters were deeply opposed to progressive policies.

Seemingly still reluctant to admit that voters rejected their far-left agenda, Progressives are again voicing their frustration that the Democratic Party has not been radical enough throughout the 2022 campaign season. Last month, the Rep. Cori Bush (D-MO) pushed back against the suggestion that “Defund the Police” hurt Democrats electorally, telling CNN host Don Lemon that “there is no data that actually shows that saying “defund the police” costs actual elections. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, meanwhile, said Democrats hadn’t gone “big enough” in implementing price controls and other costly government programs.

Meanwhile, Democrats hoping to cultivate a “moderate” image and hide their hardline voting record have blamed progressives for not focusing on kitchen table issues like the economy and crime. Representative Elissa Slotkin, one of the most threatened Democratic incumbents this fall, subtly leaned on progressives’ obsession with policies like the Green New Deal and student debt cancellation, saying “if you can’t talk directly to people’s wallets and talk about our view of the economy, you’re only half a conversation.(Notably, though, Slotkin joined House Democrats in voting for big policies expenses that caused these wallet problems for voters.)

Even former President Obama – himself familiar with far-left politics – has stepped up criticism of progressives. “Sometimes people just don’t want to feel like they’re walking on eggshells,” Obama said in a podcast late last month, referring to Democrats’ perception of “pronoun police” more concerned with political correctness than by issues like inflation and the economy. . He went on to say that Democrats must avoid being a “buzzkill.” Former Bill Clinton adviser James Carville was even more blunt, saying progressives “are all nice people,” but “they’re very naive, and they’re all about language and identity. And that will… But they don’t win the elections.

Other Democrats facing losses in congressional races also complain that weak gubernatorial candidates are dragging them down. In New York and California in particular, Democratic operatives fear that unpopular governors Kathy Hochul and Gavin Newsom — both facing re-election this year — could result in losses in some key House races, even if Hochul and Newsom succeed. to win. Democratic strategists have also privately expressed concern that Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams — who trails Republican Gov. Brian Kemp by more than eight points in the latest RealClearPolitics polling average — is dragging Sen. Raphael Warnock in his bid for re-election.

Another favorite scapegoat for Democrats has been President Joe Biden, whose polls remain underwater with most demographics. Biden has been conspicuously absent from several key Senate campaigns, and many candidates have avoided the president altogether during his visits to their state. Several prominent Democratic strategists also lambasted Biden’s deeply divisive and angry speech earlier this week, calling a possible Republican victory a “threat to democracy.” Faiz Shakir, Bernie Sanders’ 2020 campaign manager, said before the speech: “I hope there are people in the White House watching, because when you think of that address he’s on the point to give tonight – hope they rewrite and focus on the cost of living David Axelrod, former chief Obama strategist tweeted that “for a matter of practical politics, I doubt that many Ds in the fringe races are eager to [Biden] be on TV tonight.

For House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and many mainstream media outlets, voters themselves deserve the most contempt for impending Democratic losses. “I can’t believe anyone would vote for these people,” she told the New York Times last month. “A vote for Republicans may well be the last you’ve ever cast,” scolded Ryan Cooper, an MSNBC columnist. Jennifer Rubin, supposedly “conservative” columnist for the Washington Post, accused anyone who votes Republican of being an “uninformed” voter and “betraying democracy.”

The one person no one on the left seems to want to blame for the impending red wave, however, is herself. Beyond blaming rival factions, there is little self-reflection going on. But given that virtually every Democrat helped implement the radical liberal agenda that has now put the party in a dire election strait, perhaps looking in the mirror is the best place to start laying blame for any loss on election day.

Andrew Abbott is the pseudonym of a writer and public affairs consultant with more than a decade of experience in DC at the intersection of politics and culture.  







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Republican Governors Association sends money to Minnesota to give Scott Jensen a last-minute boost https://p-andalucista.org/republican-governors-association-sends-money-to-minnesota-to-give-scott-jensen-a-last-minute-boost/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 19:01:20 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/republican-governors-association-sends-money-to-minnesota-to-give-scott-jensen-a-last-minute-boost/ Republican Scott Jensen’s bid for Minnesota governor gets a last-minute boost from the National Association of Republican Governors, which is spending money to support him and sending Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds here to rally around him. On Tuesday, the Republican Governors Association (RGA) donated $750,000 to the Heal Minnesota political committee. Heal Minnesota has already […]]]>

Republican Scott Jensen’s bid for Minnesota governor gets a last-minute boost from the National Association of Republican Governors, which is spending money to support him and sending Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds here to rally around him.

On Tuesday, the Republican Governors Association (RGA) donated $750,000 to the Heal Minnesota political committee. Heal Minnesota has already run a few ads attacking Walz for felony in the state.

In his latest announcement, which was funded with RGA money and aired Thursday, Heal Minnesota falsely claimed that Walz was “pushing to defund our police.” Walz took issue with the failed 2021 ballot measure to replace the Minneapolis Police Department with a new public safety agency.

Reynolds will reunite with Jensen and his running mate, Matt Birk, Monday night at the American Legion in Golden Valley.

With just over a week to go until Election Day, Minnesota is attracting last-minute attention from National Republicans in hopes that the state’s GOP party can flip seats in Congress, the state legislature and major state offices.

Jensen was also endorsed by former President Donald Trump last week. In a post on his Truth Social account, Trump praised Jensen as someone who will “bring Minnesota back from the brink.” Trump also endorsed GOP Minnesota Secretary of State Kim Crockett.

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The Alzheimer’s Association walk will take place on October 29 at Segra Stadium in Fayetteville. https://p-andalucista.org/the-alzheimers-association-walk-will-take-place-on-october-29-at-segra-stadium-in-fayetteville/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 09:09:18 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/the-alzheimers-association-walk-will-take-place-on-october-29-at-segra-stadium-in-fayetteville/ When Jay Reinstein was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease four years ago, Fayetteville’s deputy city manager was devastated. “It was a punch in the stomach,” he said. Now Reinstein, who retired early, is a board member of the Alzheimer’s Association. His diagnosis came, he says, after noticing he had trouble remembering and understanding information discussed at […]]]>

When Jay Reinstein was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease four years ago, Fayetteville’s deputy city manager was devastated.

“It was a punch in the stomach,” he said.

Now Reinstein, who retired early, is a board member of the Alzheimer’s Association.

His diagnosis came, he says, after noticing he had trouble remembering and understanding information discussed at work meetings. Doctors were able to detect the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease during a brain scan, Reinstein said.

He is currently taking Namenda and Aricept, drugs intended to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

More: Local help‘You are not alone’: Cumberland County Council on Older Adults fights dementia

“I think some days are better than others,” he said.

After disclosing his diagnosis to colleagues, friends and family, he and his friend Tracey Broyles formed the Jaywalkers, a group of family and friends who participate in the annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s Disease, a national event that raises awareness and funds care, support and research. The march this year in Fayetteville is at 9 a.m. Saturday at Segra Stadium, 460 Hay St.

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OFCCP Week in Review: October 2022 #4 | Direct Employers Association https://p-andalucista.org/ofccp-week-in-review-october-2022-4-direct-employers-association/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 19:50:31 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/ofccp-week-in-review-october-2022-4-direct-employers-association/ Wednesday, October 19, 2022: The Biden administration on the horns of another vaccine mandate dilemma: While the “legal handcuffs are now off” allowing the reinstatement of the president’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal contractors, the President is now slowing down the restoration of His mandate The Office of Management and Budget (OMB)—the administrative arm of […]]]>

Wednesday, October 19, 2022: The Biden administration on the horns of another vaccine mandate dilemma: While the “legal handcuffs are now off” allowing the reinstatement of the president’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate for federal contractors, the President is now slowing down the restoration of His mandate

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB)—the administrative arm of the White House that regulates federal executive branch agencies for the president—and the Federal Workforce Security Task Force (“SFWTF “) initially announcement on Friday, October 14 that they intended to release guidelines for COVID-19 safety protocols for contractors’ and subcontractors’ indoor workplaces soon. The agencies then updated those October 14 guidelines on October 19. Significantly, both directives also instruct federal executive branch agencies, in no uncertain terms, NOT to impose any currently pending vaccination mandates…. waiting for what?… more announcements from the OMB.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Last week’s pause in the renewed imposition of a federal contractor vaccination mandate, now mature and ready to be implemented (as of Tuesday, October 18, 2022) on federal contractors in 28 states (and populated federal territories ), and not on covered federal contractors in 22 other states (15+7: see below) where injunctions still enjoin the president’s vaccination mandate, is clearly designed to in effect allow a beleaguered president to:

(a) exceed midterm elections in progress and which end in 17 days;

and

(b) buy time to see if the COVID-19 pandemic can slow down further in order to avoid the imposition of another highly unpopular vaccination mandate at a time when the President has declared that the COVID-19 pandemic was over. Remember, it’s been nearly two full months since the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit (Atlanta) issued its August 26, 2022 decision (see below) lifting the national warrant ban. vaccine that President Biden ordered federal contractors to implement more than a year ago (September 9, 2021). The national injunction was to officially end on Tuesday of last week: October 18, 2022…hence the timing of the October 14 and 19 directives.

This guidance from October 19 is now contained and reflected in the October 14 update. tips at the same URL link. (OMB/SFWTF has simply (helpfully) edited in addition to their October 14 guidelines. As a result, you can see both the original October 14 guidelines and the October 19 update on the same page). The updated guidance documents followed the August 26 decision of the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals. decision to restrict a previously issued nationwide injunction against the Biden administration’s COVID-19 vaccination requirement for the workforce of federal contractors and subcontractors (which we have already discussed here). As such, federal PAS contractors and subcontractors in any of the 22 injunctive states (listed below) should anticipate updating COVID-19 vaccination policies for their employees at some point in time. the future…depending on the policy and future development of the continued spread or not of the COVID-19 virus.

How we got here

President Biden educated federal executive agencies and departments (via Executive Order 14042) on October 9, 2021, to include a clause in federal contracts requiring contractors and subcontractors to comply with SFWTF guidelines for protection against the COVID-19 virus. These guidelines required that all employees of covered contractors be fully vaccinated against COVID-19, imposed masking and physical distancing requirements at covered workplaces, and required the designation of one or more COVID-19 safety in covered workplaces.

A litany of litigation soon followed. Federal contractors, including many states that had signed federal contracts (usually through state institutions of higher education and/or state utility companies), filed suits in federal courts. These complaints resulted in injunctions terminating the application of the SFWTF directive in several jurisdictions, including 15 states that had initiated the litigation (Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire , North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Tennessee and Wyoming). Additionally, a lawsuit filed by seven other states (Alabama, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, South Carolina, Utah, and West Virginia) in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Georgia resulted in the emission from an (ironically dated) December 7, 2021 at national scale injunction as to the Biden vaccine requirement. We discussed this decision and its implications here and here.

In response to the national injunction, the SFWTF issued shortly after tips indicating the federal government would take no action to enforce any of the implementation requirements of Executive Order 14042 in light of the national vaccine mandate injunction. We have indicated that the advice in our December 13, 2021 RIF. However, once the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a nationwide injunction was too broad and limited the Southern District of Georgia injunction to the seven states and associated builders and contractors who sued as plaintiffs, the Biden administration was “all cleared.” to reinstate its COVID-19 vaccination mandate imposed on federal contractors in certain states after federal courts formally lifted the nationwide injunction effective last Tuesday, October 18, 2022.

With advice from the OMB and SFWTF last week, that time has now come. First, the Administration will provide guidance to federal agencies on what injunctions remain in place and how agencies must comply with the current legal landscape. The OMB has promised guidelines that will include instructions to federal agencies as to whether they can begin inserting appropriate clauses into applicable federal contracts to apply to federal contractors.

Second, the Biden administration (through the OMB and SFWTF) has indicated that it intends to update its guidelines for implementing Executive Order 14042. This update will include a timeline for covered contractors and subcontractors to implement compliance with any new security protocols that may issue. It is unclear at this point what updated protocols the guidelines may require, given the changing magnitude of the COVID-19 pandemic and more recent scientific studies related to what works best to combat the spread of the virus. COVID-19 viruses.

Finally, the administration asked the OMB to ensure that any new guidance promotes “economy and efficiency in federal contracts” so that agencies can provide written notice to contractors regarding timing and enforcement of Executive Order 14042. Readers may recall that the authority to ensure “the economy and efficiency of federal contracts” under the federal procurement law was the basis on which the Biden administration justified the imposition of a vaccine warrant from the federal contractor (and this argument that courts imposing injunctions have uniformly dismissed as insufficient authority.) This latest step is clearly an attempt by the administration to better shield any future direction of possible legal obstruction.

What should federal contractors do now?

Entrepreneurs need to start preparations now to comply unless you want to “roll the dice” and hope that the policy and future evolution of improving COVID-19 illness and death rates will work for halt the implementation of the President’s federal contractor COVID-19 vaccination mandate. It may be a good idea to “dust off”, review and familiarize yourself with any past policies your business may have adopted during previous shutdowns so you know what vaccination and mask policies were or are currently in place. Remembering where you’ve been can better enable your business to adapt to whatever new guidelines may require. Contractors and sub-contractors who are concerned that the future guidelines are too broad should also begin to undertake efforts now to lobby the administration on the appropriate limitations of its promised future guidelines. The arguments related to the consequences of too heavy limits on an economy close to recession may prove convincing for an administration already bloodied by the controversy over vaccination.

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Hamilton County Education Association begins process to secure new contract for educators https://p-andalucista.org/hamilton-county-education-association-begins-process-to-secure-new-contract-for-educators/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 20:36:26 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/hamilton-county-education-association-begins-process-to-secure-new-contract-for-educators/ The Hamilton County Education Association (HCEA) has submitted enough signatures to start the conference process in conjunction with Hamilton County Schools. Formerly known in Tennessee as collective bargaining, the collaborative conferencing process brings together educators and district leaders to create a memorandum of understanding that outlines pay, benefits, insurance, working conditions and other provisions of […]]]>

The Hamilton County Education Association (HCEA) has submitted enough signatures to start the conference process in conjunction with Hamilton County Schools. Formerly known in Tennessee as collective bargaining, the collaborative conferencing process brings together educators and district leaders to create a memorandum of understanding that outlines pay, benefits, insurance, working conditions and other provisions of educators.

Under the Professional Educators Collaborative Conference Act (PECCA), a professional employee organization must submit a petition signed by 15% of certified educators to trigger a poll calling for a collaborative conference. HCEA submitted approximately 1,550 signatures, or 40% of certified educators.

“We are looking to improve teacher meetings and time planning. We are just looking for time to go to the bathroom, which for some teachers is so difficult. We are really looking to give teachers a voice on what is not working well because the goal is really to have the best working conditions to attract teachers,” said HCEA President Jeanette O Markhail. “We want teachers who are considering coming to Hamilton to think, ‘Oh, they’re paid well. They have excellent working conditions. They are respected. They are not leaving the profession en masse in Hamilton County. We want this message to be something we can really spread and everyone can support.

If the majority of educators surveyed say they want a collaborative conference, the district and professional employee organization will meet in the spring semester to create the memorandum of understanding, which may cover salary, insurance, benefits, working conditions, grievance procedures, time off, and payroll deductions for non-political activities.

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Memorandum of Understanding signed with Ont. Association of Aboriginal Welfare Administrators https://p-andalucista.org/memorandum-of-understanding-signed-with-ont-association-of-aboriginal-welfare-administrators/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 18:38:22 +0000 https://p-andalucista.org/memorandum-of-understanding-signed-with-ont-association-of-aboriginal-welfare-administrators/ On October 3, 2022, the Ontario Native Welfare Administrators Association (ONWAA) and the North Ontario Service Delivery men Association (NOSDA) sign a memorandum ofunderstand that commits organizations to consult on legislative policy and problematic areas where we share interests or goals in a way that is respectful of the ONWAA/NOSDA relationship. ONWAA President Samantha maracle […]]]>

On October 3, 2022, the Ontario Native Welfare Administrators Association (ONWAA) and the North Ontario Service Delivery men Association (NOSDA) sign a memorandum of
understand that commits organizations to consult on legislative policy and problematic areas where we share interests or goals in a way that is respectful of the ONWAA/NOSDA relationship.

ONWAA President Samantha maracle and NOSDA VSHair Michelle Boileau sign the memorandum of understanding ONWAA Bboard meeting in Toronto.

The Ontario Native Welfare Administrator’s Association (ONWAA) is a professional association
committed to providing services to First Nations Social Services administrators in Ontario.

Currently, 105 First Nations Ontario Works delivery agents support ONWAA through
membership submissions. Members are made up of social service administrators
responsible for administering social services in Ontario.

Northern Ontario Service Providers Association (NOSDA) was trained to develop a co
operational and collaborative approach with municipalities and municipal organizations,
facilitate consolidated municipal service delivery in Northern Ontario. NOSDA is
intended to create a political forum to review and develop both policies and programs
delivery issues from a northern perspective.

“In the true spirit of achieving meaningful truth and reconciliation, NOSDA members want to reflect on how eachh of us can play a role in the journey of reconciliation by recognizing that it is a ongoing process of establishing and maintaining respectful relationships. NOSDA Members want to work with ONWAA members so that we can learn from each other and develop and maintain a sustainable respectful relationship this to build a better coming for everybody in our communities”. a statement said.

“We also believe that from a service delivery perspective, NOSDA members should support
people as they move between our communities making sure they are treaten with respect and in a culturally appropriate way”

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